I'm sure it's been discussed many times before, but please indulge me with your 2009 opinion:
With a company that has a very casual dress code (interactive marketing company), do you recommend the old adage, "Dress for Success" and advise to wear the suit and tie to the interview. Or do you back off to the dress shirt and slacks. How about earings on guys?

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My .02 cents. I think it is better to over dress than take a chance... you can always take the tie and jacket off in the interview, if the "feel" is right (maybe could work in your favour to ask them if they are comfortable with the tie removal if you feel over dressed once there).

I would suggest going the conservative approach at first, by the sound of things ie even the question re earings on a guy, you feel that could be an issue... if that is your feel... don't do it. Get to know the company personally and make the judgement call after that.

Why give anyone an option or excuse to say "no", if you think something like that could be an issue.. take it out of the equation.
That was my inner thought on the subject. That's for confirmation.
JL

Dan Nuroo said:
My .02 cents. I think it is better to over dress than take a chance... you can always take the tie and jacket off in the interview, if the "feel" is right (maybe could work in your favour to ask them if they are comfortable with the tie removal if you feel over dressed once there).

I would suggest going the conservative approach at first, by the sound of things ie even the question re earings on a guy, you feel that could be an issue... if that is your feel... don't do it. Get to know the company personally and make the judgement call after that.

Why give anyone an option or excuse to say "no", if you think something like that could be an issue.. take it out of the equation.
My opinion is pretty much the mirror image of Dan's but figure I'll chime in to offer more confirmation. Even in my office the dress code is more on the casual side of business casual. Most people outside of our sales department never wear a tie and we come in jeans on Fridays. That said, I wore a suit for all three of the onsite interviews I had and would suggest anybody interviewing her do the same. In my opinion a suit and tie is interview attire, so even if their environment is more casual it will probably not be a shock to see you dressed up for the meeting.

Regarding the earrings I would definitely leave them out for the interview process. Even though it is pretty socially appropriate for men to have them, many places do not allow them at work. Despite the very casual nature this could still be the case at this marketing company in question. If after interviewing and landing the job you find it is ok to have them, by all means put them back in.

The test is really quite simple for the interview. If you think there is a chance your appearance could be controversial at all, don't do it. If you're the right person for the job, being dressed (or decorated) inappropriately would be a terrible way to miss out on the opportunity!
Literally my life motto: It's better to be overdressed and look like a fool, than to be underdressed and actually be one.

:)

Or another one from a Joseph Abboud ad: "Dress Like Your Boss's Boss."
I'd have to echo the sentiments of those above me. Even for a Generation -Y slacker who doesn't need to impress anyone (tongue in cheek) I would always wear a suit and tie to any interview. Just like Dan N first said, "you can always take the tie off". It's gotta be better that being the only one in the room without one.
Not to sound like a broken record but I concur with everyone! I will stress No Earrings unless you are applying for a job at Piercing Pagoda. That's a no brainer.

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