Boo.

(Oct 31, 2008) My trip to India was no less than a complete mental enema. Although the image is a bit harsh, my cherished assumptions were challenged again and again. On my return, the simplest of Western luxuries seem like overabundance.

I don't know why, but I have this recurring fantasy that moments of transformation are supposed to be fun. That the correct response to deep insight and breakthrough thinking is joy. That letting go of the old and shepherding in the new involves great pleasure.

That's what we tell ourselves..learning is fun, change is good, transitions are energizing and growth is an addictive high. More and more, I'm joining the camp that sees it in a different way.

I noticed, today, as I was getting ready to write this note, that there is a new member of RecruitingBlogs.com.

Jobing is member #13228. He/she is the author of one blog post: Jobing.com Slashes Jobs Nationwide and one forum discussion, Jobing.com. It's pretty easy to discover that this new member has no affiliation with the company that has the same name.

Sadly, you have to be paying at least a little bit of attention. The name is meant to hide the fact that this new member has it in for the company whose name he/she has borrowed. While the newbie is desperately trying to besmirch the company, the company is getting featured in the Wall Street Journal. Although it's entirely possible that there's a nugget somewhere in the screed, as search for Jobing.com layoffs produces no news in the media or the blogs.

What I noticed most in India was the layering of culture and economy. It seemed really hard to take things at face value. While there was a transactional rhythm you could observe and learn, the inconsistencies were astonishing. The difference between the middle class, the rural poor and the inner city ghettos where I stayed were enormous. Everything was variable up to and including the relative status of women.

My sense was that everything rested on your reputation. A solid culture measures and respects reputation above all attributes. Reverence may or may not be your best side. It seems like the Indian culture is good at watching the difference between word and deed.

That's something were going to get to learn about here.

As we live together in this community, we're going to start to know instinctively where the hot spots are. We're going to know where the rules are firm and where they can be bent. We're going to get to watch out for each other's reputations.

John Sumser has been chronicling the Recruiting Industry forever. You can catch his work at JohnSumser.com. He's the CEO of the Recruiting Roadshow.

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Welcome home. We missed your perspective.
Nice article - I feel I know where you are coming form, having just returned from Egypt. Different culture, different truth different sens of wealth. A
I like your writing style, very engaging. I suffered some cultural shock when I took a recruiting trip to Sao Paulo, Brazil. As in India, the social structure in Sao Paulo is very rigid. There seemed to be only two classes, the ultra rich and the ultra poor. It certainly was a place of extremes.
Kate, Your 4 words explains everything about Brazil "Ultra Rich & Ultra Poor". In India you can see Ultra Poor, Poor, Lower Class, Middle Class, Upper Middle Class, Rich, Ultra Rich.
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Ultra Poor - No Shelter, everyday's life depends on other people's food.
Poor - Once in a while use Public service., their everyday's life depends on the job that they hold on that day.
Lower Class - They don't own any vehicles, mostly use Public Service & Bikes. (In my place they call it as Cycle.)
Middle Class - Has one Motor Bike. (Motor Cycle.)
Upper Middle Class - Has One Car.
Rich - Has Two Cars.
Ultra Rich - More than Two Cars.

Point to be noted, In India beggar's are in the category of Middle Class & Upper Middle Class.
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Kate Purdy said:
I like your writing style, very engaging. I suffered some cultural shock when I took a recruiting trip to Sao Paulo, Brazil. As in India, the social structure in Sao Paulo is very rigid. There seemed to be only two classes, the ultra rich and the ultra poor. It certainly was a place of extremes.
Hi John-

We're going to get to watch out for each other's reputations.

It's going to take people who aren't afraid of being besmirched to wade across this river. It's going to take people who aren't afraid to publicly stand up for and comment on these digital indiscretions. It's going to take people who aren't afraid to do the legwork and investigate charges leveled by others.

You alone cannot monitor your reputation in our digital world - it takes a village of people to do this but for the village to work you have to open up and be real.

Sumser is for real.

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