Apparently, one of the secrets to marital bliss is to not have children. So says researchers at the University of Denver. I'm going to take a look at the study and see if I can poke holes in its design and hence, conclusions but until then, it'll make fodder for an interesting discussion.

For those with children, what lessons from parenting have you applied to recruiting? For those without kids whether by choice or because you're single, do you have any expectations as to what having children can mean - if anything - to you as a recruiter (or even easier, as a business person)?

Views: 149

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

I 'spect it's a wive's tale that people w/children are happier than people w/out.

The thing about being a parent is that you're a parent for the rest of your life.
There is no surcease.

There is also great joy in parenthood. But I've seen studies where old women with no kids are just as happy as old women with kids. And, I'd bet, the ones w/out kids have more money.

;)
I remember my mother coming home from work ( she was a recruiter ) making dinner ad then going up stairs to make phone calls for ours with her 3x5 cards. It worked for her but the agreement was that she gave me and my two sisters $10 everytime she made a placement so having kids cost her money.
While it increased her cost per hire it also made her more efficient - I'm sure the T plan did not exempt refills...

Slouch said:
I remember my mother coming home from work ( she was a recruiter ) making dinner ad then going up stairs to make phone calls for ours with her 3x5 cards. It worked for her but the agreement was that she gave me and my two sisters $10 everytime she made a placement so having kids cost her money.
In retrospect - what was it like for you having a working mom?
I remember my mother coming home from work ( she was a recruiter ) making dinner ad then going up stairs to make phone calls for ours with her 3x5 cards. It worked for her but the agreement was that she gave me and my two sisters $10 everytime she made a placement so having kids cost her money
I don't think I realized it then but when I did become a recruiter, I felt I really understood what it is I was doing and what I had to do. It's a direct result of listening to the frustrations and the highs at dinner time. My dad is a psychiatrist so he liked listening. He also liked when she made a placement.

Maureen Sharib said:
In retrospect - what was it like for you having a working mom?
I remember my mother coming home from work ( she was a recruiter ) making dinner ad then going up stairs to make phone calls for ours with her 3x5 cards. It worked for her but the agreement was that she gave me and my two sisters $10 everytime she made a placement so having kids cost her money
my spelling is terrible. sorry

Rayanne said:
Slouch said:
I remember my mother coming home from work ( she was a recruiter ) making dinner ad then going up stairs to make phone calls for ours with her 3x5 cards...

I love this story...,and I am keeping it in the article
All- have you specifically used business examples during child rearing?
Jason, did seeing your mom do this influence your schoolwork?

Slouch said:
I remember my mother coming home from work ( she was a recruiter ) making dinner ad then going up stairs to make phone calls for ours with her 3x5 cards. It worked for her but the agreement was that she gave me and my two sisters $10 everytime she made a placement so having kids cost her money.
I did terrible in school

Steve Levy said:
Jason, did seeing your mom do this influence your schoolwork?

Slouch said:
I remember my mother coming home from work ( she was a recruiter ) making dinner ad then going up stairs to make phone calls for ours with her 3x5 cards. It worked for her but the agreement was that she gave me and my two sisters $10 everytime she made a placement so having kids cost her money.
Yes. I always told my kids not to come back w/out the earnest money check when they were playing "business."
So minimal influence?

Slouch said:
I did terrible in school

Steve Levy said:
Jason, did seeing your mom do this influence your schoolwork?

Slouch said:
I remember my mother coming home from work ( she was a recruiter ) making dinner ad then going up stairs to make phone calls for ours with her 3x5 cards. It worked for her but the agreement was that she gave me and my two sisters $10 everytime she made a placement so having kids cost her money.
I think that sometimes you realize that with your children, you don't see the result of your effort necessarily day by day, especially when you have to tell them 20x not to do this, or to do that, and why. Then one day, you are told by someone...your son is so talented, or your boy is so polite! Sometimes recruitment relationships that seemingly are getting you nowhere, pay off one day. Persistence and consistency, and keeping the faith are key.

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Subscribe

All the recruiting news you see here, delivered straight to your inbox.

Just enter your e-mail address below

Webinar

RecruitingBlogs on Twitter

© 2022   All Rights Reserved   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Privacy Policy  |  Terms of Service