Hello out there,

I've been asked to give a one hour presentation at an upcoming job expo....my assigned topic is "What to expect when working with a recruiter". The presentation is geared towards the job seeker. Any of you have any pointers for me, that can get ideas flowing so I can build a good presentation. If I had been asked to write a presentation a couple of years ago, I'd have a list of 7-10 things I could discuss, but with so many job seekers out there, I'm not sure that some of the old topics still hold true. Greg Inguagiato.

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Seems simple enough. What should a job seeker expect?

They should expect whatever the recruiter says they will do. If the recruiter does not tell them in wrapping up whatever conversation or communication they have - then the job seeker should ask "What should I expect?"

I would also assume whatever the returned results are - they should be treated with professionalism, courtesy and integrity. But beyond that - just ask. If you don't like what you hear - tell them so. When/if they do not do what they said they were going to do - well then you know who you're dealing with.

Good luck on your presentation Greg!
Too often I find that a lot of candidates who have a lot of experience in a particular skill or field, don't do a very good job demonstrating success, or rather bringing to light what makes them stand out in the crowd of others who are as equally talented. They mostly give the canned answers that they've either read are "good" answers, or they are nervous and therefore don't think quickly on their feet, or they just can't bring their personal dynamic into the interview which leaves the interviewer flat. Therefore, they should notate those items ahead of time as memory joggers and cheat sheets so as to not forget their key successes, hence they'll be more at ease and their true personality will come forward.

I can't tell you how many times we've passed on perfectly qualified candidates who left us dry because they couldn't get beyond their nerves/lack of preparation/or ability to think quickly to relay a success or accomplishment that truly made them stand out. At the end of the day it's not just a skill set we're hiring, but an interpersonal literacy that is just as important, if not more important.

Good luck.
Greg - I'm assuming you mean working with a third party recruiter?

Coming at it from a bit of a different angle..

the job seeker can expect to be submitted on positions he is qualified for, only if the job seeker first makes sure his background lines up with the recruiters specialty.

Covering this right out of the gate would eliminate much frustration..some candidates act like their magic one page resume and magnetic personality combined with any recruiter equals a job, and that just isn't so..and they get irritated when it's pointed out.
Thomas, thanks, yes agreed. It's really about building the relationship from the get-go and ensuring that the job seeker understand what that is all about. Greg.

Thomas Patrick Chuna said:
Greg - I'm assuming you mean working with a third party recruiter?

Coming at it from a bit of a different angle..

the job seeker can expect to be submitted on positions he is qualified for, only if the job seeker first makes sure his background lines up with the recruiters specialty.

Covering this right out of the gate would eliminate much frustration..some candidates act like their magic one page resume and magnetic personality combined with any recruiter equals a job, and that just isn't so..and they get irritated when it's pointed out.
Peter...exactly. I refer to this as "articulating" Twice this week, I met with candidates who had GREAT resumes on paper, but unfortunately, try as I might during the course of the interview, I could not get either candidate to come to their own defense when giving them the oppty. to tell me what makes them better than the average bear. Greg.

Peter Ceccarelli said:
Too often I find that a lot of candidates who have a lot of experience in a particular skill or field, don't do a very good job demonstrating success, or rather bringing to light what makes them stand out in the crowd of others who are as equally talented. They mostly give the canned answers that they've either read are "good" answers, or they are nervous and therefore don't think quickly on their feet, or they just can't bring their personal dynamic into the interview which leaves the interviewer flat. Therefore, they should notate those items ahead of time as memory joggers and cheat sheets so as to not forget their key successes, hence they'll be more at ease and their true personality will come forward.

I can't tell you how many times we've passed on perfectly qualified candidates who left us dry because they couldn't get beyond their nerves/lack of preparation/or ability to think quickly to relay a success or accomplishment that truly made them stand out. At the end of the day it's not just a skill set we're hiring, but an interpersonal literacy that is just as important, if not more important.

Good luck.

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