I was wondering what is a good time frame for a follow up call with a client after candidate second interviews. For example, a candidate had a second interview with the company 2 days ago with the CEO. My contact and the first interview was with HR and another Manager. I have already sent a brief email to HR.

Most positions I've filled have been done with one interview or one panel interview. I have just over 1 year of recruiting experience - hence the question.

Thanks

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Now would be a good time. I figure it this way. if you did the work to find the candidate, you need feedback in order to do your job the right way. So call your client, let them know you would like some feedback on your candidate so that you can keep the ball rolling. It's important that the energy you create for the candidate and the client (hopefully) does not die. You should have already debriefed your candidate and I would also let the client know in the message you leave or the conversation you have that you have feedback from the candidate. I hope this helps.
I think 2 days is long enough so give them a call although it is possible the CEO may have been too busy to get back to HR!
Thanks, I appreciate the quick and helpful response!

Slouch said:
Now would be a good time. I figure it this way. if you did the work to find the candidate, you need feedback in order to do your job the right way. So call your client, let them know you would like some feedback on your candidate so that you can keep the ball rolling. It's important that the energy you create for the candidate and the client (hopefully) does not die. You should have already debriefed your candidate and I would also let the client know in the message you leave or the conversation you have that you have feedback from the candidate. I hope this helps.
24 hours. Then 12 hours. Then 6.
Many interviewing processes involve 2 interviews. I would guess - maybe half?

The thing to take away from this - is "What can I do next time?" as for this one you're kind of in the dark as to the process. Give them a call. You'll probably get voicemail. Leave a message "Hi. It's me. Just wanting to make some notes on your feedback from the interview with XXXX" This is not a "selling" time - as in - don't say "Candidate really loves your company, feels the culture is a perfect fit and is anxious for an offer" This isn't the time for that. Just leave the message and wait for them to call you back. If they like the person they'll be in touch pretty soon. If not - they sometimes communicate that through their lack of follow up with you. Sorry - that's just the way it is.

But don't tell your candidate "I haven't heard anything. I don't know what's happening! I would have thought they'd call me by now. I wonder what's wrong.' Just let them know it's usually a few days for the manager and HR to get their notes together - hang in there.

Now. NEXT time - and EVERY time - you need to have this discussion with your client during the initial conversation about the job and confirm each step of the way.

"Much of my success comes from being an active participant in the process. Each project I work on is unique. Some are rather quick. Others are more complex and have longer time lines. Both are fine with me. What is important, however, is that I have a clear understanding of the process so I can help keep the communication flowing between your company and the candidates I present. Please describe for me your interviewing process - and the timelines between each step...."

Then you'll know what to expect. You won't feel "in the dark" as you might now. And you won't be left guessing as to what's going wrong.

Once you've had that discussion - you then have the "authority" to follow up as per your previous discussion. But until you've had the conversation - you're not really in any position to expect anything.

Hope this helps. Good luck Viv!
Really nice comments Jerry

Jerry Albright said:
Many interviewing processes involve 2 interviews. I would guess - maybe half?

The thing to take away from this - is "What can I do next time?"
After an interview you have to follow up immediately with both the client and candidate to determine how things went.

Your goals are:
1. get all the detail;
2. bridge any differences or hesitation;
3. figure out next steps; jump on opportunity.

The things you have to do in these interview follow up conversations are:
1. listen carefully to what they are telling you and look for any objections you need to handle;
2. turn negatives into positives;
3. Give off energy with your upbeat and motivating style to generate enthusiasm;
4. take notes as you may have to modify your job order or recruiting targets to find a match

When speaking with a client after an interview you want to get feedback asap by asking questions like these:
1. How did it go?
2. Who else got to meet the candidate?
3. What did you talk about?
4. On a scale of 1 to 10 how would you rate the candidate as a match to the job?
5. What would it take to make them a 10? Are there any areas of concern?
6. Tell me about the positives on what you liked about the candidate?
7. Ask for the offer? When do you want him/her to start?

Make certain your candidates are following up every interview with personalized handwritten thank you notes. They can help you to close deals. A candidate who wants the job can also leave a phone message, provide samples of work, forward additional information, give more detail on experience needed, etc...

Remember: Time Kills Deals

Happy hunting!

Craig Silverman
Great responses from all. I fully agree with Gerry's comments:
"Now. NEXT time - and EVERY time - you need to have this discussion with your client during the initial conversation about the job and confirm each step of the way."

It is all about managing expectations of the client and the candidates.

I believe 24 hours is a good general principle.
There is so much expert advice here I'll just support it :-)
I"m with Karla... set expectations up front... great advice all. Don't just call up with a "how did it go?" call with information... "Candidate... found it ... is excited about moving forward etc etc.. what are your thoughts?" etc

cheers

Dan

Karla Porter said:
There is so much expert advice here I'll just support it :-)
Karen - you wonder why nobody mentioned gathering the candidate feedback immediately - and then calling the client immediately to dump that information on them.

First - Viv here is asking 'what do I do? - I can't get them on the phone." That's a different topic. Her topic is about uncovering the process, setting expectations and then expecting feedback in the agreed upon time frame.

What I gather from your reply is one should get the feedback from the candidate first (which happens 95% of the time) and immediately call the client and flood them with how much the candidate loves them and wants the position. In my opinion this is the very worst approach to the most critical (or top 3) parts of our job.

Once you tell the client how much your candidate loves them - they no longer have a need to sell. So you've cut off any "stretch" they may have been considering. Heck - if the candidate loves them so much - why should they use the maximum salary range? The list of reasons why this is wrong goes on and on. I've only had 1/2 cup of coffee so far today. Maybe I'll come back and add a few more thoughts.

I'll wrap up with this. In recruiting there are what I call "critical" non-sell/information gathering times. Interview follow up is information gathering and refining concerns/objections then closing toward the end in summary fashion.

NEVER
call the client and tell them how much the candidate loves the job UNTIL you've gathered the client feedback FIRST. Then - do it one little piece at a time.
As a young recruiter, reading through this discussion thread has been very educative for me. I stand with the experts on this. Cheers.

KarenM said:
Curious, Outside of Craig, how come no-one else mentioned candidate calling immediately after the interview, and giving the client a recap up of the follow up Immediately after? Also getting from them a recap to give back as feedback to the candidate?

Was there a reason many mentioned a delay of 24 hrs or more?

MHO - there is no time as the present, and as a recruiter, the most dangerous element that goes against us is time. Time allows new candidates to enter the picture, other recruiters to be more aggressive, and candidates to have other interviews.

What comes also from too much time, it is the overthinking from mental busting, from too much time that can kill deals..

With the feedback from both Client and Candidate, one can also find what may have been missed in the interview.. did they really understand each other. Did the candidate truly describe their experience, well enough, or did the company explain the job in a way to keep the candidate interested.

The recaps are the most important way to address both the client and candidate concerns and perspectives of the interviews, and personally they should be done immediately after the interviews (all of them) whilst information is still fresh..

. It also allows an opportunity for the closing for the offer as well.. It is when you can say to the candidate, if the offer was in the bag right now, will you accept, and then the same back to the client..

It is MHO that we should offer the same deference and treatment to the candidate as we would apply to the client..

Craig, you are right on the mark with the questions.. curious, do you happen have a Snelling Training manual or taken their training ;)

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