Hi all,

Australia is normally a couple of years behind the US in terms of technology, TV shows and economic conditions. I think this gap is shrinking with new Globalisations etc...

However I don't think we have seen the full extent of the Economic crisis here as yet. I hate reading the papers due to all the hyperbole I believe is inside them, however I thought this forum may help with a realistic view of the world I could come to see. What should I expect from a Recruiting point of view or business in general?

Cheers

Dan

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Steve and All.

Steve, Dan and Maureen:

In my response to Maureen earlier, I listed an article on Next-Level leadership. I would welcome your thoughts. Anywhere Leadership is an interesting idea but in the siloed world of healthcare my experience is that most of the people who run health systems and hospitals are very traditional in their leadership (read: all too often command and control).

As we enter tougher economic times, I think the Next-Gen workers are in for some unsettling times. As companies thrash around to survive, all the features that attracted them to a particular company may get lost in a top-down turnaround or survival mentality. I would be interested in getting Dan's perspective down under.
Attachments:
Two things worth seeing:

- Pictures of Russia Today

- Thoughtful conversation on the State of The World with Bruce Sterling.
And if you want to see what is wrong with so many companies today, visit AOL and watch two people stuck on an escalator. For those of you who are much adept at sorting out illustrative videos, and you have already seen this, my apologies.

http://video.aol.com/video-detail/stuck-on-an-escalator/2164665949

Cheers.....
re: Sterling, what we need here is a modern day Jack Kerouc. You know what John? You look awfully Bohemian in your tam...

John Sumser said:
Two things worth seeing:

- Pictures of Russia Today

- Thoughtful conversation on the State of The World with Bruce Sterling.
John-

For those who aren't link clickers, the subtitle of the video is "Gov't employees on an escalator." But the issue here John is the issue everywhere - a large part of every work force is just average, average, average and won't go outside-the-box for anything.

This is where the traditional model of leadership fails - expecting someone else to take the lead to save those stuck on the escalator. In healthcare for example, far too many nurses who become recruiters believe it is unethical to call into hospitals to recruit nurses; somewhere in healthcare, the leadership in recruiting taught this as a tenet and it stuck.

Why should healthcare innovate? It's not as if there are many alternatives...

John G. Self said:
And if you want to see what is wrong with so many companies today, visit AOL and watch two people stuck on an escalator. For those of you who are much adept at sorting out illustrative videos, and you have already seen this, my apologies.

http://video.aol.com/video-detail/stuck-on-an-escalator/2164665949

Cheers.....
Steve, I agree. The article on Next-Level Leadership by friend and colleague Rand Stagen of Dallas put me on a quest to establish next-level executive search. I have been working hard, asking how can we adapt our process -- using a client-centric focus and innovate -- to deliver a more compelling valuable and an enduring portfolio of services.

Here is my frustration: There is this undercurrent among some healthcare CEOs that if you do not do things the way the so-called white-shoe firms run their searches -- the Korn Ferrys, the Witt/Kieffers, the Heidrick & Struggles -- then you cannot be as good or trustworthy. They go with the reputation, not the quality, the value or the sense of partnership, which includes putting a hunk of your fee AT RISK based on the performance of the candidate that the search partner recommends.

Too many CEOs want safe. Here is the interesting point -- when we pull back and act like the other guys, we seem to be a more acceptable solution. But I am too hard-headed, I guess. Improved value – exceptional results – by search firms who WILL innovate will win in the end. I hope.
How about this... look for hospital CEOs who blog; under the presumption that they might be more innovative, they might also be amenable to new styles of search. Google "hospital CEO blog" and start contacting.

Playing it safe means never having to grovel to the Board and say you're sorry.

John G. Self said:
Steve, I agree. The article on Next-Level Leadership by friend and colleague Rand Stagen of Dallas put me on a quest to establish next-level executive search. I have been working hard, asking how can we adapt our process -- using a client-centric focus and innovate -- to deliver a more compelling valuable and an enduring portfolio of services.

Here is my frustration: There is this undercurrent among some healthcare CEOs that if you do not do things the way the so-called white-shoe firms run their searches -- the Korn Ferrys, the Witt/Kieffers, the Heidrick & Struggles -- then you cannot be as good or trustworthy. They go with the reputation, not the quality, the value or the sense of partnership, which includes putting a hunk of your fee AT RISK based on the performance of the candidate that the search partner recommends.

Too many CEOs want safe. Here is the interesting point -- when we pull back and act like the other guys, we seem to be a more acceptable solution. But I am too hard-headed, I guess. Improved value – exceptional results – by search firms who WILL innovate will win in the end. I hope.
Steve, I value your comments. Thanks.

To Dan and Maureen, cheers.

I have enjoyed the sharing of ideas.
What I am seeing here is a knee jerk reaction to things. I am seeing little in the way of pro-activity, lots of hunkering down, some even moving away from what had made them successful companies in the first place in the race to slash costs, maintain the shareprice. Innovation, taking calculated risks etc, seem to have been replaced with cynacism, and big red pens for slashing budgets.

How would it work I wonder if there were some brave people in the places of power who said (Steve Jobs style) "You know what? This has made us successful, we have a great product, people love what we do, let's now strive for ways to differentiate more, do it better.

People will always be the key to success not numbers (OK a good product wont hurt), although the numbers ensure we get paid, without the quality people and the need for fresh injections of these people will or should continue to ensure that things keep turning. What ever happened to the thought of a skills shortage, Baby Boomers leaving the work force, not enough new people entering the workforce? Is that thought still relevent?

I enjoy the discussions over leadership, as I traditionally see way more Management than Leadership, but when you see, feel, hear Leadership, it really does inspire.
Good morning Dan (uh, sorry, good evening!)-

While I enjoy a seeing a good inspirational leader at the top of a company, I am far more enthralled with situational leadership - anyone can be a situational leader. The question to ask is - curiously enough it is the same question I ask about diversity - does the organization structure itself such that anyone can be a leader (or per diversity, does the organization place illogical barriers that anyone must hurdle to move up the ladder) and the the barriers to being a leader don't destroy leadership thinking?

Dan Nuroo said:
What I am seeing here is a knee jerk reaction to things. I am seeing little in the way of pro-activity, lots of hunkering down, some even moving away from what had made them successful companies in the first place in the race to slash costs, maintain the shareprice. Innovation, taking calculated risks etc, seem to have been replaced with cynacism, and big red pens for slashing budgets.

How would it work I wonder if there were some brave people in the places of power who said (Steve Jobs style) "You know what? This has made us successful, we have a great product, people love what we do, let's now strive for ways to differentiate more, do it better.

People will always be the key to success not numbers (OK a good product wont hurt), although the numbers ensure we get paid, without the quality people and the need for fresh injections of these people will or should continue to ensure that things keep turning. What ever happened to the thought of a skills shortage, Baby Boomers leaving the work force, not enough new people entering the workforce? Is that thought still relevent?

I enjoy the discussions over leadership, as I traditionally see way more Management than Leadership, but when you see, feel, hear Leadership, it really does inspire.
"Banks and card companies are bracing for a wave of defaults on credit card debt in early 2009, and they are vying with each other to get paid first. Besides, the sooner people get their financial houses in order, the sooner they can start borrowing again." More here.

CREDIT CARD DEBT....This issue is hardly discussed right now. The American media is too busy fretting over a 4.9 percent decline in holiday sales. As people lose their jobs, they struggle to pay bills. Unemployment insurance hardly covers a $100K (US) lifestyle. I am worried about a wave of credit card defaults that could drive down more banks. The U.S. Federal Reserve has used all their ammo to jump start the economy.
Steve, whilst I cannot disagree with your thoughts on situational leaders, to allow that, don't you need a strong, secure, inspirational leader who can inspire, encourage and allow others to lead. There are always informal leaders around any place, however without the encouragement and recognition from THE leaders the situational leaders will disappear, either going somewhere where they will be recognised, or simple stop contributing as the efforts could seem fruitless. Is s companies culture a reflection upon the leadership of the company or the managements?

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