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You know it's time to "divorce" a client when the irreconcilable differences defy:  attempts to make it work; counseling; therapy; and when your last nerve has been jabbed.

When all that has happened it's time to D-I-V-O-R-C-E.  However, most would do it the WTF? stage.

I am thinking your picture says how I feel. We send people for interviews at this account and for every 5-6 resumes we send they interview one, and that one isnt always the "one" to get it. As soon as you staff it they either fire someone or someone quits that you staffed. After lots of counseling I am thinking it might be time to divorce them.Thoughts

Valentino Martinez said:

You know it's time to "divorce" a client when the irreconcilable differences defy:  attempts to make it work; counseling; therapy; and when your last nerve has been jabbed.

When all that has happened it's time to D-I-V-O-R-C-E.  However, most would do it the WTF? stage.

Here are the questions.

If they are only interviewing 1 out of 5 or 6 what is the profile of the ones they interview? It would seem you might not be qualifying narrowly enough. Review the resumes of the ones they interview whether they hire or not and find the common denominator.

What reasons are they giving for firing? Is there a reoccurring reason,ie; not strong enough in a certain skill set. If so up your criteria for focus on more experience in that skill. If it is all over the board it may be time to just decide that this company is a revolving door.

Same thing on why people quit. Could they not do the job, is it the managers?

I am assuming you have tried to analyze the problem so if there is nothing you can change on your end then it's time to quit submitting candidates. If they ask why, then it's time for a discussion with internal recruiter or hiring manager to try and define the problem. If that doesn't work just go find another client where you can define the needs and work effectively.

There are companies who are revolving doors. There is no reason to damage your reputation by being part of it so they can blame the recruiter for not being able to hire and retain employees.

When they keep moving the goal posts, it's a signal for me.  When their story doesn't stay consistent based on feedback, it's time to pack your bags.  The feedback should lead you closer to calibrating the right candidate.  If it doesn't, there's something wrong with the search.

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