How to Get Job Descriptions and What They Should Include

In our last blog post, we discussed why you should get job descriptions for all your job orders, especially your contracting job orders. But how do you get job descriptions and what should be in them?

Well, typically, the how is easy. Simply ask your client for a job description when you get the job order.  But for some reason, it can be like pulling teeth to get this information from some clients.  So what do you do in that scenario?

First, check out the company's Web site. The site could give insight into what the company does and may even have descriptions of specific jobs if the site includes a "Careers" or "Jobs" section.

If that fails, conduct an Internet search for the job title. You may also want to check http://www.occupationalinfo.org/index.html which provides a "Dictionary of Occupational Titles." Although universal job titles may not be industry or client-specific, they can provide a basic understanding of the job.  Plus they can serve as jumping off points for converstations with the client that could help you get more information from them.

Even if you do get a job description from the client, it may not provide all the information you need.  Whether receiving them from clients or piecing them together yourself, make sure all job descriptions contain:

  • Basic responsibilities of the position
  • Required education and experience
  • Expected hours of work
  • Location (e.g., in an office, a plant, or in the field)
  • How much travel will be involved
  • Special physical demands of the job

Debbie Fledderjohann is the President of Top Echelon Contracting, Inc.

Views: 84

Comment by Jerry Albright on September 23, 2011 at 3:39pm

Sorry Debbie - but if you are even CONSIDERING working on a position the client will not give you the details on - you're making a bad call.

 

Having to piece together an understanding of what your client wants by cruising the internet is the first sign that you are working for someone who is NOT working WITH you.

 

 

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