Turning Up the Heat on Diploma Mill Education Verification

There has been ongoing controversy as to what is a diploma mill and what is a legitimate institution of education. Most are obvious. Major universities, colleges that have been accredited by national and state accreditation bureaus are the easy ones. Some of the diploma mills with no real accreditation other than a website and a place to collect tuition are the other no-brainers.

But then there are all the in-between schools, the schools that have been subjected to controversy and a bit of rancor. In two articles, one in the New York Times, and the other inGawker, several private, for-profit schools have been accused of providing less than stellar educations. Among the accusations, the listed schools, and others, are accused of staffing a sub-part teaching staff. The education they provide have come under suspicion and many graduates complain of heave debt loads and low paying jobs.

According tot he other in the New York Times, for-profit education companies have come under intense scrutiny from Congress, amid growing concerns that the industry leaves too many students mired in debt, and with credentials that provide little help in finding jobs. Kaplan is facing several legal challenges The article notes that the Florida attorney general is investigating eight for-profit colleges for alleged misrepresentation of financial aid. The investigation also focuses on deceptive practices regarding recruitment, enrollment, accreditation, placement and graduation rates.

There are assorted whistle blower suits and accusations that many practices within the for-profit schools constitute one big scam, designed to obtain money from the federal government for student funding while leaving the student holding the bag for the debt. In the economic downturn, with many employers downsizing staffs and laying off workers, more unemployed are seeking to better their chances at finding new work by going back to school. Many schools of interest are the for-profit schools, which one source told me are doing a bang up business by teaching the desperate new skills.

Is it fair? Are they really preying on the unemployed who are hoping in this lousy economy to better their chances of finding work by assuming a great deal of debt for advanced eduction. Many are saying the erstwhile students are not getting much bang from their buck. As for the schools themselves, they are in danger of losing federal funding as many of their disgruntled graduates are failing or refusing to pay off their loans. Once the number repaying the debt falls below 45 percent the school is at risk of losing eligibility for federal money.

What is the bottom line to this? To me, the bottom line is simple. Human resources personnel and recruiters conduct education verifications. Do they consider a degree from a for-profit university on par with that from a more traditional university? Does it really increases a job applicant's chances of getting hired? Does it give the candidate any real edge, or is that piece of paper simply not worth those thousands of dollars in debt?

I would want to know up front if employers regard the for-profit degree with the same consideration they would from say a public university or college. I would venture it may have some heft but not the same type of credibility one achieves by graduating from a more traditional school. Common sense would deem this to be the case,

I am curious about this. There has been ongoing controversy as to what is a diploma mill and what is a legitimate institution of education. Most are obvious. Major universities, colleges that have been accredited by national and state accreditation bureaus are the easy ones. Some of the diploma mills with no real accreditation other than a website and a place to collect tuition are the other no-brainers.

But then there are all the in-between schools, the schools that have been subjected to controversy and a bit of rancor. In two articles, one in the New York Times, and the other inGawker, several private, for-profit schools have been accused of providing less than stellar educations. Among the accusations, the listed schools, and others, are accused of staffing a sub-part teaching staff. The education they provide have come under suspicion and many graduates complain of heave debt loads and low paying jobs.

According tot he other in the New York Times, for-profit education companies have come under intense scrutiny from Congress, amid growing concerns that the industry leaves too many students mired in debt, and with credentials that provide little help in finding jobs. Kaplan is facing several legal challenges. T The article notes that the Florida attorney general is investigating eight for-profit colleges for alleged misrepresentation of financial aid. The investigation also focuses on deceptive practices regarding recruitment, enrollment, accreditation, placement and graduation rates.

There are assorted whistle blower suits and accusations that many practices within the for-profit schools constitute one big scam, designed to obtain money from the federal government for student funding while leaving the student holding the bag for the debt. In the economic downturn, with many employers downsizing staffs and laying off workers, more unemployed are seeking to better their chances at finding new work by going back to school. Many schools of interest are the for-profit schools, which one source told me are doing a bang up business by teaching the desperate new skills.

Is it fair? Are they really preying on the unemployed who are hoping in this lousy economy to better their chances of finding work by assuming a great deal of debt for advanced eduction. Many are saying the erstwhile students are not getting much bang from their buck. As for the schools themselves, they are in danger of losing federal funding as many of their disgruntled graduates are failing or refusing to pay off their loans. Once the number repaying the debt falls below 45 percent the school is at risk of losing eligibility for federal money.

What is the bottom line to this? To me, the bottom line is simple. Human resources personnel and recruiters conduct education verifications. Do they consider a degree from a for-profit university on par with that from a more traditional university? .Does it really increase the applicant's chances of getting hired? Does it give the candidate the edge, or is that piece of paper simply not worth those thousands of dollars in debt? I would want to know up front if employers regard the for-profit degree with the same consideration they would from say a public university or college. I would venture it may have some heft but not the same type of credibility one achieves by graduating from a more traditional school.

Common sense would deem this to be the case. Nevertheless, I am eager for feedback. Anyone with insight to this, I would welcome your thoughts.

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