Hi guys, with 3 years of pure agency recruiting in oil and gas, warehouse, accounting, and environmental health industry focus, I have been offered a Corporate Recruiter role at one of Houston's major commodities inspection and environmental quality control global leaders.  I will begin there April 1st and have placed my resignation with my current agency.  

I decided to make this step because of the daily grinding of agency recruiting has gotten a little old and I'm ready to represent one brand (instead of juggling 3-4 clients at one time).

To the Corporate Recruiters, what are some ways to succeed in Corporate Recruiting?  What things have you noticed that are different than agency recruiting?  I won't get the commissions, but I will get some good experience with working with one brand and being able to focus directly with hiring managers.  

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Once you go corporate you will never see how and why you stayed in Agency that long.  I did it for 3 years as well, and could never see myself in that type of role again.  

First, congrats on your new role.  I come from Corporate only, so I don't have the Agency insights that the rest of the group does. (but I do love my Vendor Partners!).  I agree that the most VITAL part of success; is your relationship with the Hiring Manager, becoming their partner, and thier recruiting expert. 

  • Learn about the business itself, learn about their culture, who is their competitor, what do people who do what they do hang out in professional organizations, etc.  That will help build your candidate pool.
  • Some of your managers will need their hand held thru the entire process, they can be needy of your time, etc, and some managers won't even give you the time of day, so be ready for dealing with vasts amounts of personality.
  • Every company has a different "Recruitment Process" and flow of events. That is the bog in corporate recruiting; the huge amounts of data tracking and reports that are required.
  • I keep two separate calendars. One I call "Manager". That is the one where I book EVERY interview they are conducting.  I keep my calendar for my interviews, my events, etc.  And just like another post, I calendar my phone screens, my time with managers, etc.
  • When I schedule the manager's interviews (some won't require this), I always send a soft copy of  the resume. I send a separte emial to the candidate. (In my experience, not sharing the managers email and contact information is a good practice, in case the interview does not go well- you are the point of contact). If they are in the same building I also drop by with a hard copy. For high level interviews(executive level), I also include a summary calendar for their interview schedule for the day/week, in addition to the hard copy, or I make sure their admin has a copy. I make sure the receptionist knows to expect candidates (just simply share that same summary calendar), and on it goes.
  • You will learn what works for you, what works for your manager and for your company. Don't be afraid to ask.  You are the expert, but in the beginning, they are new to you. Just ask their preference.
  • We generally carry a high level of req's, and you will learn to balance those. Some manager's will say....aww...just send me every resume, some will want a very detailed candidate summary, etc, and some companies require a documented phone screen, some don't.
  • When you are screening candidate's now, you still have to sell, but you also want to get to know them. Does their personality fit with the hiring manager, the company. The selling part is not as vital as you are used to. If they don't fit, they don't fit.
  • Sometimes you can work on a position for weeks, you put in extra hours to get the phone interviews done, you share the 4 most incredible candidates with the manager, and then guess what....the position gets cancelled, or George from accounting refers his nehpew directly to the manager, and your 4 awesome candidates just got kicked to the curb.  See...even the crazy stuff happens in Corporate.

KKenner, that was excellent!  Thank you so much, I start officially on Monday, so I'm uber excited. I am the 2nd person to fill this role, so I'm ready for the challenge...

Question: Of course, my role is to avoid the need for third party agencies, but what is your policies on reaching out to vendors/suppliers for  role?  Is there a time span that must pass for an open req before you reach out to a supplier (I am assuming so)?  I know companies can differ. 

Jai, that is an excellent question.  It really depends on your company's protocol. If I took the average of everywhere I worked, the more unique and hard to fill it is, or the more senior, my companies were more willing to spend money on adding a Vendor Partner. It also depends on volume. Usually, when discussing the recruiting plan with the hiring manager, if we are allowed to use a 3rd party, we discuss then, when, etc. Alot of companies I have worked for, also require the vendor use our agreement, not theirs, that we agree on the rate ahead of time (we don't let the manager's make those agreements), and all candidates filter thru HR (so we can avoid duplication of candidates, and to make sure that every candidate, 3rd party or direct, all apply for the positions the same). These type of logistics is very company specific, not just a general how to. I would say however, that if you are not finding the right candidate within 2 weeks, it may be time to ask for help. For example, I never use 3rd party for Admin Assistants, File clerks, Marketing Coordinator, etc, but I most certainly might for a UX Information Architect, or a CFO. 

Have a blast learning all the in's and out and making your way in Human Resources! You will have to update us from time to time!
 
Jai Turner said:

KKenner, that was excellent!  Thank you so much, I start officially on Monday, so I'm uber excited. I am the 2nd person to fill this role, so I'm ready for the challenge...

Question: Of course, my role is to avoid the need for third party agencies, but what is your policies on reaching out to vendors/suppliers for  role?  Is there a time span that must pass for an open req before you reach out to a supplier (I am assuming so)?  I know companies can differ. 

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