I am curious if anyone uses a template or form with clients when they send in a submittal that they send back to indicate they received the resume and you are the owner of the candidate?

This is in the case of companies with no database.

I get permission from my candidates to represent them at my client companies, but have found lately, that they are getting hired months later. Sometimes I am given a mea culpa and asked for a reduced fee. Other times I am told, we never "saw" your submittal and sourced the candidate ourselves.

While I make every attempt to follow up on submittals, to me, no answer is an answer - "no interest". Plus, you can't keep asking after every submittal month after month

I am thinking I need to formalize the process and have either a read receipt or a form sent with each candidate that the client returns to me.  Another approach would be to send a blind candidate and if there is interest, then provide the full name and company.  I hate to be this way, but after 18 years in this business, I am tired of losing fees....

How are others handling this.....

Views: 563

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Interesting question, Roni. We had a client call US once to let us know that a candidate that had declined offer 6 months prior, called the hiring manager and said changed mind, internal HR saw his name and called to let us and the hiring manager know that was our candidate to be paid on. I have wondered sometimes how a recruiter would know if a candidate got hired in the future, bar the candidate or client letting you know. 

Does read receipt work if they elect not to say yes to read receipt? Also, if you don't know a candidate is hired in the future then you will still be missing the fee. I'd like to think most of my clients and candidates would let us know if a hire occurs at a future date, but know that aside from any deliberate attempt to be underhanded there are times that personnel change or candidates don't know/think they should give the original recruiter a call, etc.

I want to be clear. I am not contending here that there is anything underhanded going on. I am trying to create a process where submittals do not fall through the cracks and we get paid for our work.

Amber: To answer your question, Usually I find out about the candidate getting hired through LinkedIn...  and when I call my company contact to inquire about it, I am told things like: it was a different position that was not approved for a fee OR we never saw/logged your submittal and sourced the candidate ourselves (later).

Candidates don't want to get involved in getting us paid, nor should they.  They are new to the company and need to be loyal to the company, not us.

You are fortunate the client hired the candidate after he turned down a previous offer.. most wouldn't....

I think there should be a clause in your contract that says candidate submittals are yours for a defined period, say 12 months.  If the candidate is hired within that time frame,  you receive payment.

Backing up, though, I would hope you have a solid enough relationship with the hiring managers, or HR, that the communicate with you regarding the candidates as you submit them.  Are you getting feedback immediately?  Are you discussing each candidate with the hiring manager/HR?  Are you staying in contact with the candidates?  Do you provide contact info with each of your candidates?

Looking at it from the outside, it would seem there's a disconnect in the process.  If you don't provide contact information and the client goes out of their way to track them down, go through the interview process and then hire them, I'd look for a new client!  If you don't provide the contact info and they client already has them in their files (you said they don't have a database?), then you should receive partial fee (providing it's in your contract).  If you provide the candidate contact information, STOP doing that!  :)

You are a valuable resource for your clients and should be compensated as such.   

Thanks Linda. I do have a 12 month ownership clause, along with 48 hours to tell me if they already have them in their database, and that having them on a list to be called does not count (language in the contract is more detailed than that). I do not provide contact info. All of this is not what the issue is.

The situation here is that there are times I do not get confirmation on every submittal.  Plus, positions are put on hold and then re-opening much more often these days and often I am not notified when they reopen.  What I was asking is what process do others use to track a 12 month period for each submittal. How many times can you follow up with a company and candidate to be sure there is nothing happening without your knowledge?  It is easy for things for fall between the cracks, even if you work the way we always have.  That's why I am thinking, perhaps, I need to formalize things even more.


Linda Ferrante LoCicero said:

I think there should be a clause in your contract that says candidate submittals are yours for a defined period, say 12 months.  If the candidate is hired within that time frame,  you receive payment.

Backing up, though, I would hope you have a solid enough relationship with the hiring managers, or HR, that the communicate with you regarding the candidates as you submit them.  Are you getting feedback immediately?  Are you discussing each candidate with the hiring manager/HR?  Are you staying in contact with the candidates?  Do you provide contact info with each of your candidates?

Looking at it from the outside, it would seem there's a disconnect in the process.  If you don't provide contact information and the client goes out of their way to track them down, go through the interview process and then hire them, I'd look for a new client!  If you don't provide the contact info and they client already has them in their files (you said they don't have a database?), then you should receive partial fee (providing it's in your contract).  If you provide the candidate contact information, STOP doing that!  :)

You are a valuable resource for your clients and should be compensated as such.   

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Subscribe

All the recruiting news you see here, delivered straight to your inbox.

Just enter your e-mail address below

Webinar

RecruitingBlogs on Twitter

© 2020   All Rights Reserved   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Privacy Policy  |  Terms of Service