I am was wondering if anyone has any strategies for a new company to have the ability to effectively source with out paying rediculous monthly charges for the bigger sites. I look forward to hearing everyones feedback.

Views: 324

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

I'm going to assume you mean recruiting companies...

Learn how to find forums, association sites, etc. so you can see what is going on in different industries, which companies may be good sources for potential candidates and so forth. You may find people you'll be targeting as potential candidates to network with.

 

EVERY single candidate or client you talk to - ask them for referrals. Every time. I had a candidate who did not work out for a position, but he gave me approximately 20 referrals and I've placed 2 of them so far. I try to always do something "extra" for someone who comes through like that - I don't pay referral fees, but I find something they might want help with that I can provide. Most end up wanting help with a resume rewrite, cover letter, advice on company they're interested in working at, etc. Or help for a spouse, friend with those type of things.

 

Learn how to do searches on the 'net. There are a lot of free resources, and also many paid trainings and webinars that will teach you how to do searches. Check out braingainrecruiting.com, and also right here at RBC there have been free trainings offered - there is a link at the bottom left of screen to recruitingwebinars.com.

 

LinkedIn is good for joining groups that are relevant to what you're going to work on.

 

Deleted

Iam going to share a blog post it will help you to sourcing candidates through boolean string automation visit http://www.egrabber.com/TU422DH97

Thanks, Amber! :)

Our recruiting company is http://braingainrecruiting.com/; the blog with the sourcing hints is separate and is http://booleanstrings.com/ with the most recent post being 

The Twenty-Five Boolean Strings


Amber said:

I'm going to assume you mean recruiting companies...

Learn how to find forums, association sites, etc. so you can see what is going on in different industries, which companies may be good sources for potential candidates and so forth. You may find people you'll be targeting as potential candidates to network with.

 

EVERY single candidate or client you talk to - ask them for referrals. Every time. I had a candidate who did not work out for a position, but he gave me approximately 20 referrals and I've placed 2 of them so far. I try to always do something "extra" for someone who comes through like that - I don't pay referral fees, but I find something they might want help with that I can provide. Most end up wanting help with a resume rewrite, cover letter, advice on company they're interested in working at, etc. Or help for a spouse, friend with those type of things.

 

Learn how to do searches on the 'net. There are a lot of free resources, and also many paid trainings and webinars that will teach you how to do searches. Check out braingainrecruiting.com, and also right here at RBC there have been free trainings offered - there is a link at the bottom left of screen to recruitingwebinars.com.

 

LinkedIn is good for joining groups that are relevant to what you're going to work on.

 

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Subscribe

All the recruiting news you see here, delivered straight to your inbox.

Just enter your e-mail address below

Webinar

RecruitingBlogs on Twitter

© 2023   All Rights Reserved   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Privacy Policy  |  Terms of Service