It seems that I am leaving candidates a greater percentage of voicemails these days.  I've be playing with different messages to see if one gets a greater call back percentage than another, but can't really tell so far based on the data.  I typically leave it somewhat vague (because in my area, legal, most candidates want in-house, and most of our positions are law firm, so I don't mention the employer type).  But I'd love to hear if anyone out there has a format that they use for voicemails that seems to work well in getting candidates to return calls (for purposes of this discussusion, I'm really only concerned with candidates...) 

Does anyone have any recommendations for voicemails that have worked for them?

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I've had some luck with saying "Please call me as soon as you can. My Client is interested in your skills and experience and we need to move quick in order to get you in front of them!" That has more people calling back than anything. When they do call back, they already have a sense of urgency which is always nice. I hope that helps!

If it is someone I have a resume on I tell them "I have an opening that I think you are a perfect fit for. Give me a call." If it is just someone I am looking to network with and could become a candidate I tell them "I need your professional expertise on a project I am working on. Please give me a call."

 

Both have worked really well.

Thanks very much Isaac and Kim...I'll definitely give both versions a try.

The last recruiting company I worked for required leaving a 90 second message. I didn't believe in that theory, especially since I came from Advertising Sales and those messages were all about being short and sweet. I just make sure to identify myself and state their name more than once. I try to point something specific out about their resume that interested me. I feel that no matter what, some people are just more inclined to respond to an email. I always try to do both.

Arianne,

 

Yes, I will often send out an email as well.  And I would agree that the response rate for emails is better (although just slightly).  I'm just hoping to find a way to increase, even if just by a small percentage, the number of returned calls I get from voice messages that I leave with potential candidates.

 

Thanks very much for your response!

I find the best way is to just leave your name and number, nothing else - human curiosity usually prevails and they'll ring back.  A lot of the time I'll just leave my first name and number - they'll think they know me or have met me at some stage.  Be sure to mention their name too, so they don't think it's a wrong number.  This works brilliantly with clients too. 

Conor...I like it.  I'm definitely going to give it a try...

I am Douglas Holt President of Langdale Recruiting , I have a career opportunity which I am sure will be of interest to you. Please call me if your would like to learn more.

I totally agree with both Kim and Issac. I actually use both of their responses (replies) together. I introduce myself first, then I let them know that I'm seeking qualified candidates for a certain position with a client of ours in the (City, ST) area, and i've reviewed their resume and in my opinion have the skills/qualifications that my cleint is seeking. I then tell them to call me as soon as possible as these positions fill fast, and I'd like to present their resume as soon as possible. I then thank them for their time and let them know I will also follow up with an email so they have my contact information in front of them also,
 
Isaac Kelly said:

I've had some luck with saying "Please call me as soon as you can. My Client is interested in your skills and experience and we need to move quick in order to get you in front of them!" That has more people calling back than anything. When they do call back, they already have a sense of urgency which is always nice. I hope that helps!

I am so glad to have an opportunity to share about this topic.  My preference is to always leave a voice mail and email when I can.  Although sometimes you don't have both.

When I leave a voice message while cold calling I am short and a bit mysterious.  I say something like "Hello my name is Elise Reynolds, I am not sure if I am in the right direction but you were referred to me(even if they were not).  Would you please call me back at XXX-123." 

 By saying "I am not sure if I am in the right direction "makes me seem like I need help, the fact that someone referred this person to me  says  this person could help me makes them feel a bit more obligated to call.  It does not have a 100% rate but it is maybe 50%. 

If I found thier name on a job board or something I leave a straight forward message about this being a job opportunity and a few details about the position.

With emails I typically say I just left a voice message but I also wanted to leave an email and then I go into details of the position and why it might be a good fit for them.  But putting " I just left a voice message" at the top of the email.   I think helps separate my emails from the gobs of junk mail this person might be getting

I also leave voice messages as a prelude or follow up to an email - cuts down on the recipient's automatic delete instinct if I can pique their interest and they know who the email is from and what its about. Since I always ask for referrals its easy for them to forward it they aren't interested but know someone who is.

Some things I include in my voice messages are:

  • Our connection - ie Where/when we met, where I got their info even if it was a few years ago, who we know in common, alum from a university we like to hire from, LinkedIn Group etc.
  • Somthing about the job fit - ie geo area, area of expertise, job culture, promotion over current job, what I think is the best connection for this candidate.
  • When I'm available to talk in more detail about this position - ie 1- 6 Eastern the rest of this week
  • Thank you - ie thank you for getting back to me either way And/Or -  if you're not interested I'd appreciate you sharing my information if you can suggest of someone with comparable skills to yours who might consider a job change.

And on a slightly different topic - I get my best response rates via texting... Short, sweet, easy, and I can forward messages and responses to my email account for follow up.  Better than email or phone calls if you have a cell number.

Hi Rickie,

What kind of texts do you normally send?  How much info will you normally put in a preliminary text? 

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