Question of the day: What are your reasons for not including salary information in a job description?

In follow up to today's RBCDaily and a good question for today's #RBChat.....

What are your reasons for not including salary information in a job description?

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Loss of control, which = FEAR

We don't want to pigeon hole ourselves by putting a salary. The salaries for our positions are driven by labor categories the candidate fits into aka a strict requirement of years of experience and education (gotta love government contracting!) but we can be somewhat flexible. If we put a salary range, people who don't make anywhere near that amount are going to apply hoping they will somehow fit the job (which they usually won't). I have debated with this for a long time because I know when you include a salary with a position title you typically get many more applicants, but so far this is working for us.

We (Bullhorn) have some interesting data on this question from 38,000+ recruiters (corp and agency) using Bullhorn Reach for social recruiting.They include salary info with 29% of the jobs posted. But those jobs that DO list compensation get 47% more applicants!

This is my experience as well:  Transparency and service are the "new sales"..... Thanks for the stats Andrew!  Brian-

Andrew Hally said:

We (Bullhorn) have some interesting data on this question from 38,000+ recruiters (corp and agency) using Bullhorn Reach for social recruiting.They include salary info with 29% of the jobs posted. But those jobs that DO list compensation get 47% more applicants!

I am so glad to see the comment from Bullhorn.  I work with other recruiters who ask that I not post salaries with their jobs, but I always dopost salaries on my own jobs.  I know you will get some "wish I were" types, and a few who will not even consider the job because it is too low (sometimes a client will move higher for a top candidate, especially if they are not getting very good fits for jobs).  I think in general, it is better to list than not.  I waste time, and so do candidates who are qualified for jobs at a higher salary level, when the client will not move higher on the salary. 

A well written job description should discourage ill fitting candidates and attract best fitting ones.  I also think salary range should be posted to stop the incessant questions about, "What does it pay?"

You may get additional applicant traffic but you will also be attracting and helping the ideal candidates to jump into contention. 

I also suggest putting your direct phone number into the Recruitment Ad Copy.  You have to be reachable to the great candidates that are out there.  Yes, you will get unwanted applicant traffic--but the few strong candidates are worth the multiple misfits.

How do you write "whatever it takes" in a numerical field?

That's usually the answer I get from clients to the salary question.  All the bullhorn aside, I don't thin it has an effect in my

specialty.    

I normally post salary ranges unless the company asks me not to.  If a client says whatever it takes i ask them if they will pay 200K, if they gag i ask , how about 150K  still gagging, how about 125K...well maybe.  Ok that is the very top of the range.  in Bill's situation i post, "This is a new position, client indicates they will review candidate salary history and asking salary to determine what they need to pay to find the top candidate for this position."  I will send a couple of expensive candidates and a couple in the middle or lower range to see if my client is really ready to step up or if they want to bring the job in at mid range.

 

The only thing i don't like about posting salary ranges is that all candidates will always ask for the top of the range.  That is normally pretty quickly overcome by letting them know that this is a range and the top is normally offered when a candidate is interested in  making a lateral move.  It has been my experience that posting salary ranges increases the responses of top candidates.  Get a lot of i wanna make that much but that's ok.  Half of the candidates lie anyway or include what they think is the cost of their company provided parking spot in their total comp package.

 

I dont' post company names but i do give the company name to any candidate that i am phone interviewing.  If we get that far they have a right to know and evaluate the company and give permission for their resume to be sent.. One reason why people hate recruiters is all the secret crap.  I wouldn't want my resume sent someplace without knowing where it was going.  Could be the hiring manager and the current boss play golf together or some connection through a professional organization.

Here at WunderLand, we're all about openness and disclosure, so we do put in salary ranges, or hourly rate ranges for contract jobs. We read the blogs and discussions of job seekers, and they want to know up front if the job is in their range.

I do post salary ranges in my postings. Sandra's comment that the top of the range is offered only to candidates seeking a lateral move is a good one...I often say that companies pay the top of the range to those who are assessed by the company as being "10" in all of the areas of expertise desired....and those who have significantly more than the minimum education and experience requirements. Oftentimes, I will tell those hoping to get over 25%+ raise that companies do consider what salary a candidate currently makes and that such a large raise is very unlikely to get approved....

I assume most candidates don't read those disclaimers.  Just as when you say 'local candidates only'

Really, I'd rather talk to them about it. 

Our salary ranges aren't listed in our ads, but I do share them up front during the phone interview. I think it's interesting that candidates will complain that we're not providing this information in a job description but then hem and haw all during the interview process so they can negotiate when there's something on the table. Transparency on both sides is key.

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