The problem with recruiters is that most of them are focused on “closing the deal”and all else is just details. They will do anything necessary to simply make a placement and invoice their customer. They don’t have their customer’s best interests at heart. His only concern is getting paid and getting past the guarantee period!

Sad, but true for many, if not most recruiters. Oh sure, they “care” about the outcome. But not more than they care about submitting an invoice. In most cases, they are not committed to the success of their clients. They are committed to doing whatever is necessary to obtain a fee for services. This is almost universally true of contingency recruiters and sadly even true for many in the retained camp. It’s a basic human flaw that people are “self” first and “others” second. It is rare to find a recruiter who will do the right thing when they must decide between telling the truth and remaining silent. There is a lot at stake for a recruiter in the short term, and it takes incredible character to do the right thing when there is a large sum of money at risk. There is a sacred trust in a relationship with a company and it’s recruiter. My belief is that very few of them make the right choices when facing this dilemma.

Here are some examples of What is Wrong with Recruiters:

A. Over-preparing candidates on how to appeal to all of the hiring managers’ “hot buttons”
B. Editing a resume to cover up “red flags”
C. Pressuring both candidates and hirers to make a decision that may not be in their best long-term interests
D. Not searching for the best candidates, but only skimming the “low hanging fruit” of the Internet
E. “Flinging” resumes of people they haven’t vetted nor received permission from
F. Presenting the same candidate to multiple companies in order to create greater urgency
G. Concealing obvious flaws of their candidates

These are some of the problems with recruiters and “just cause” for HR to suspect bad behavior from them. Considering these examples, is it any surprise the industry has a poor reputation?

There is much that can be done to positively impact this bad rap, but it must start with recruiters doing the right thing at every turn. It is simply the best way to build your practice and reputation. It requires seeing beyond the short term financial gain and believing that by doing what is right for your client, you are building a business with honor and integrity, and by doing it this way, you will get repeat business. As i said, it is the right way to build both your business and reputation. If you can’t stay in business doing it right, you really should get out. There are far easier ways to make a living. Besides, you’re bringing down an entire industry!

Bad behavior isn’t right no matter how many placements you make! Do us all a favor and go do something else!

For more blogs from the author visit www.druedeangelis.wordpress.com

Views: 8911

Comment by David Wells on March 27, 2012 at 11:53am

@ Drue De Angelis

Don't back off on your statement.  This is the opening statement of your blog.

"The problem with recruiters is that most of them are focused on “closing the deal”and all else is just details. They will do anything necessary to simply make a placement and invoice their customer. They don’t have their customer’s best interests at heart. His only concern is getting paid and getting past the guarantee period!

That statement focuses on the recruiters and their actions.

After being excoriated by professional contingent recruiters who chose not to operate in this fashion you then try to back pedal and say the issue is with the contingency search model.  That is not, nor has it ever been the case.  The contingency model is just fine when carried out by professional who do have their client’s best interest in mind.  Does the contingency model allow for some resume brokers to exist who only care about getting paid.... Of course.  Every profession has their own ambulance chasers. 

You continue to fail to understand how professional contingent recruiters operate and the sad thing is you are continuing to comment on a business model that you obviously do not understand.  Until you understand how to reconcile the contingent business model with being a professional I suggest you read more and learn about the business in which you are supposedly an "expert."  Actually reading this blog, instead of continuing to post factually incorrect missives, may be a good place to start.  Good day.

Comment by Brandi Cooper on March 27, 2012 at 1:57pm

@David Wells  You are right on point, well stated.

As pointed out before, It’s transparent that Drue cannot generate an authentic sales pitch and is again using this social media platform to spew his ambiguous opinions as part of his marketing campaign. 

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