How a Comments/Chat Section Makes Your "Recruiting SEO" Explode

Ongig believes that one day all job pages will have live interactivity such as a comments/chat feature.

First off, it’s a great experience for the candidate — they get their questions answered (questions that often aren’t answered in a standard job posting).

But it’s great for internal recruiters too — especially for search engine optimization (SEO). Hundreds of candidates Google you and your team and jobs and the more content/text there is on your job pages, the more easily they will find you.

Recruiting SEO Comments Chat-1

When Salesforce.com included chat/comments in this job ad, it 4X’d the number of keywords attractive to Google/SEO

Let’s take the Account Executive position from Salesforce.com (pictured).

The reason that this particular job ad is so strong in SEO is simple math:

The 42 comments that have been made about the job generated new 2,385 words for the job posting.

4Xing Google Traffic

That’s more than 4 times the number of words (492) that the job ad had before Salesforce added comments to its ad.

In other words, the Comments section (which allows candidates to ask Salesforce.com about the AE job) was able to 4X the text content describing the job; and Google and other search engines pick up on these relevant words.

Here are some examples of categories of keywords that Google picked up on  in this particular job ad that you can use to attract more traffic.

Hiring Managers

When you offer a Comments feature to your job, the hiring manager has a chance to identify themselves and answer questions.

For example, the Salesforce AE hiring manager Mark Wayland is identified every time he answers a question or corresponds with a candidate — Google then sent dozens of people who searched for “Mark Wayland” to his job!

Comments or chat generate keywords SEO traffic to job ads

Recruiters

If you have a recruiter on your team, they can participate in comments/chats about a job. For example, Salesforce.com recruiter Kelly Wasden gave his input on working at Salesforce and a number of people arrived at the job ad because they searched for “Kelly Wasden.”

Comments or chat generate keywords SEO traffic to job ads

Candidates

Some candidates even arrive to a job ad because they searched the name of another candidate who had commented on the job. In this case, the Salesforce.com AE job received a few hits from people searching “Kazim Acar Met Life Insurance.”

Job Ad traffic is generated by users who search for names of candidates

Evangelists

Amazingly, a few candidates found the salesforce.com AE job by searching “Supermedia,” the name of a company who employed a Salesforce evangelist who had made a comment endorsing the salesforce platform.

Comments and Chat on a Job ad create keywords related to connectors

Skills

Many candidates found the  Salesforce AE job through searching skills needed for the job — 10 candidates Googled “quota Salesforce” and  ended up on the job ad because an anonymous commenter had mentioned that they had always been above “quota.”

Chat and comments create skills keywords for job ads

Customers

Finally, it was neat to see that 2 candidates found the Salesforce AE  job by searching “arista,” the name of a customer that one candidate mentioned they were close to.

Recruiting SEO Chat and Comments generate customer keywords to job ad

These types of keywords generated as part of the comments/chat feature can generate substantial organic search traffic for you job ad and generate quality applications.

For more on SEO in recruiting, check out 5 Things Everyone Should Know About SEO in Job Descriptions.

Rob Kelly is a 3-time CEO, advisor and writer. He currently leads Ongig on its mission to make job ads visual, social and interactive. Before that, he helped lead Hot Topic Media (dating advice), Mojam (live music) and Topica (email marketing). Previously, Rob was a journalist at CMP Media where he interviewed leaders ranging from Steve Jobs to Bill Gates to Julia Childs. Rob began his love of business early, attending his first shareholder/board meeting when he was 16 years old. Rob's writings can be found at RobDKelly.com and in his book An Enlightened Entrepreneur: 57 Meditations On Kicking @$$ In Busin... .

Views: 298

Comment by Jason Kemp on March 26, 2013 at 12:09pm
I completely agree with this - now I just need to get Jim on board. Any words of advice?
Comment by Jason Webster on March 26, 2013 at 4:57pm

I'd think he would be down with this. Let's set up a time to chat in April.

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