Okay, maybe I'm a little "wee the world is great" but as a seasoned recruiter, who loves this work - I've been through the rough stuff and "get" that this particular economic climate is temporary; painful, but temporary.

I'm not skipping into work all "wow this is super fun" - but no whining either. It is what it is, stay true to the basics, keep your conversations whole and productive, don't skip the important stuff, and use the time to market yourself as an expert and take peeps to lunch.

Activity Activity Activity. Right? Am I losing my mind here?

So why is my team busy chatting on Gmail, and talking about the weekend well into Tuesday?

Why isn't role modeling motivating them...

I refuse to start yelling, and the let's kick (beep) stuff is apparently falling on depressed ears.

Any thoughts on motivating a young team - one that has taken it on the chin quite a bit recently, but needs to shake that off and get to it? There is work to be done here and I need them fired up...and quite frankly, its making me tired....like I'm cheering on a losing team.

AND we just landed a couple of HUGE clients and have plenty of work...like the rest of us, they are the tougher roles and the placements are down, but we're carving our space and doing a fair amount of business. We'll be here when the market returns, a little beat up, but we'll be there...I'd like them to understand that....and my way isn't producing results - so I'd love your ideas.

Thanks! JT

Views: 274

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Couldn't agree more Jerry - If you have a solid practice with the basics, add all the Tweeting, Facebooking, etc etc you want on TOP of that - I am all for embracing new recruiting technology - as an additional tool not a replacement. Because at the end of the day, it is the connection, the relationship, you create that builds a more substantial reputation and creates longevity with your clients, a longevity that gets you through times like these. There is NO way you can build that rep Tweeting.

And Steve? I'm more like your assessment of Paul. {evil smirk}

Jerry Albright said:
The thing is here Steve (great reply by the way) that they are NOT going to make any placements Twittering.

There. I've said it. Sorry kids - it's time to pick up the phone, call "these people" and make "this presentation".........sorry but lets start with what we KNOW works. All these latest tools are only a variation on ways to MAKE PRESENTATIONS. So let's master MAKING PRESENTATIONS first - then move on to the hot new tools and SM du jour.


P.S. Tweeting your hot job and hoping it gets RT'd does not count as "making a presentation"....lo siento mucho.
Steve Levy said:
Not only that Ms. McCartt but there are distinct "generational" differences:

I'll bet that Gino and Jennifer hate being yelled at, you and Jerry would chuckle while saying "F U, I'm going to make your presence obsolete", and Paul might simply look at a person, smile and quasi-evil-slow-laugh, "Heh-heh-heh."

As far as incentives and rewards, the "rules" are not to give them frequently, know what incentivizes individuals, and make a pig public spectacle when giving them out.

But motivating a young team first requires interviewing them so you know what elevates and lowers their pulse. Second step - in fact this may be the first step - requires an understanding on your part that the kids grew up IMing, texting, and emailing their 24 hour whereabouts and happenings to their friends. Third, understand that the Baby Boomer parents and school teachers of these kids had their own unique way of parenting and educating; for many, work is the first time the real world reared up and slapped these maggots across their faces (lol) - and it weeh-weeh huht. Longer post required to discuss this - unless others want to jump in.

But if they produce while Twittering, do you care less about these things?
Jennifer, I am very glad that the $$$ incentive is resulting in some pushing of the buttons on the phone.

I agree with the recurring theme of responses. Determine everyone's specific "Hot Button".

As a young group, there may be another incentive that might work. Friday early release. While I was with an agency, we were offered the opportunity to leave early on Friday if we had 5 send outs for the week. I welcomed the ability to go pick up my kids from school for a change or meet up with a couple of my friends for an early start to the weekend. Now mind you, due to the added activity I was doing to earn my reward (which included staying late on other nights), there were many times that I was just too busy to take advantage of the incentive and that was okay with me because I had the option. I liked the individual send out goals better than a group send out goal. It seemed unfair that someone that didn't contribute to the reward was able to benefit.

Another possiblity is Friday Happy Hour Social. Create a group goal with the reward that you will take them out for Happy Hour after work on Friday. This works if your team gets along well and will get them to socialize during non-prime hours instead. It can also give you the benefit of learning more about each individual since people tend to open up more in a social setting.

Take a few minutes to brain storm reward ideas with your group. You may be surprised what they come up with and since they are involved in the process, will take ownership in the reward and activity behind it.

I also like continuous training. Listening to what works for others or new approaches always lights a fire under me. It creates an urgency to get on the phone because I can't wait to try that. Everyone responds differently so use a variety of trainers or successful methods to create more AHA moments.

I was never into the brow beating. Reward the positive instead. If someone keeps beating me over the head about my "slump", I will never see over the mountain. If someone acknowledges the steps up the mountain, it helps raise me up to the next step a little faster. As recruiters, our minds can be our own worst enemy and make that phone very heavy. We beat ourselves up enough about not getting that assignment, being on pace with last year, finding the right candidate faster, etc. that we don't need someone else throwing in a couple of punches as well.

Good luck and thanks for sharing!
You're right Steve, I don't like being yelled at, but it isn't because I don't have thick enough skin to take it. I played all types of sports as a kid and just about every coach I had broke the occasional clipboard or tossed a cooler full of gatorade to get our attention. Sure it got our attention, but I always thought it made the person doing the yelling look absolutely ridiculous. I truly find nothing about yelling, screaming, ranting, swearing, etc. to be inspiring or motivating. I think it is uncreative and similar to throwing a temper tantrum.
Sandra - you're right, nobody ever specifically mentioned swearing, name-calling or the like, so I should have been more specific in my response to Steve. Unfortunately I have had experience with managers/team leads who did use exactly those tactics when addressing the group if performance was lagging. It was not very effective for anything other than killing what morale was left and distancing a team from each other further.

That said, perhaps I had a bit of a misconception of what Maureen meant by scaring people into performing or Steve's comment about the fact that I don't like being yelled at. I find nothing wrong with passion that results in an elevated tone, telling somebody the truth of the matter when the truth hurts, or expecting results because frankly that's what is required. I do take exception to being yelled at, though, and since it has happened in a professional setting I made a bit of an assumption about what Maureen and Steve's comments meant. I'll chalk it up to not having enough experience to realize that was an anomoly and not the norm.

With regards to your comment - I don't think it is unreasonable to expect people to perform the task they were hired to do. In fact, I think it is unreasonable for somebody to expect an extra reward for simply doing the minimum. There is already a reward offered for doing the job...a commission. I think a bonus is most effective at driving results when it is offered to those who go above and beyond.
Every generation is different. Every generation (all the way down to each person) is motivated by different factors. Good managers need to acknowledge and adjust their training, motivating, and communication to get the best out of your employees. Long gone are the days of working loyally for the same employer for 40 years with the reward of a pension and a watch.

As a recruiter, I ask every candidate "When you hear about an opportunity, what is the first most important thing you must hear to be interested? Second? Third?" From the younger work force, flex time or work/life balance is usually in the top 3. Another one is the culture and liking the people that they work with. That doesn't mean they aren't any less self motivated to excel at their job. They are still aware of their responsibilities and willing to do whatever it takes to get the desired results. It is what is important to them and motivates them. I don't think my younger candidates are any different than younger recruiters.

Being a successful recruiter takes much more than a 40 hour work week. Everyone of us is on the phone in the evenings talking to candidates that work in cubicles with ears. Everyone of us spends evenings planning our next day or doing internet research. Rewarding someone who gets 5 send outs per week with a Friday afternoon off is not offering them a 35 hour work week because it takes a whole lot more effort and hours to reach that goal.

Even if you are independant, you are going to motivate yourself with extra rewards or incentives. I like to buy myself something nice or get my nails done when a check comes in. I put an annual cruise into my business plan as a reward if I reach a net profit goal. Anyone that has lost weight will tell you that non food rewards at certain milestones helps keep you going and pushing harder. Is the ultimate reward a healthier body or a great big commission check? Of course! Shouldn't you just do it because of that ultimate reward alone? Of course! I still don't see anything wrong with incentives for small goals along the way to reaching that ultimate goal.
Maybe it is time pull out the old Glenn Garry Glenn Ross scene "Coffee is for closers"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0WCcKIkMp8Y

"Have I got your attention now"

p.s - Bad language advisory warning :-)
The intention of my original post was to offer "out of the box" incentives besides $$$. $$$ is tight for all organizations and it was a suggestion that may provide the same results without Jennifer having to dig deeper into her pockets. I think we have to agree to disagree regarding whether rewards should be given.

My questions to candidates are to uncover their possible motivation for making a change and uncovering their pain. Since I recruit candidates through cold calling, they usually provide answers that would make their jobs more pleasurable. They are not looking to make a change or desperate for a new position. Sometimes my opportunity offers flex time/work from home or a better match to their personality and/or ideal culture. Sometimes not. The number one reason people leave their position is due to their immediate manager which can be a result of personality differences.

I am not part of this new generation, but rather a "young at heart" 38. I can only comment on their motivations based on what I hear from my younger candidates and as a generalization. Again, it is still very personal what drives individuals. I cannot defend their values and expectations. I also do not think that I can change an entire generation. I can either not hire them or work with them in a way that benefits them and therefore my organization.

By the way, I would answer work/life balance and flex time while I worked inside an agency for 3 years. Now, as an independant for 2 years, I value my flexibility. I can now attend more Rugby games or chaperone field trips. That doesn't mean that I don't work hard. I just get up a little earlier, work through lunch, manage my time during school hours, and bring out the laptop after bedtime. The same way that I worked at an agency but now with the priceless ability to be more available to my family.

I truly value the lively debate. Thank you for your opinions and the opportunity to share mine.
Like Sandra says, it's time to saddle up.
And Dawn, it's amazing what you can get done getting up early, isn't it?
;)
I agree!!!!!

I am normally just a casual observer. I guess I learned my lesson!

Good morning!
I tend to agree with Ross. There's nothing like modeling the skills desired to get some results from those who truly want to learn. You mentioned the team was young....maybe that's just what they need.
Jennifer,

Wow, your situation sounds like the one we are experiencing!! Much of what you wrote sounded as if it came from my own lips. I've weathered 3 recessions in my 20 years in the business. Passion, attitude, and self-motivation are vital characteristics needed to be successful. I believe that experienced recruiters must be self-motivated. It is not my job to motivate them, I am not the rah rah type anyway. I am very supportive, positive, work a desk daily and do not ask my team to do anything I wouldn't do myself. I find that my preaching, one on ones, come to Jesus talks, etc. are being tuned out. Surely, you would think by looking at one's paycheck should be motivation enough.

Thanks for sharing your struggles. It looks like you got some decent feedback and suggestions.

Best of luck!

Tom
Dawn,

I totally agree with you! The agency I used to work with did half day on Friday for those who were billing. They measured money on the board instead of sendouts, but I could see the 5 sendouts as a similar measurement. It was very motivating! It also helped push us to get the money on the board asap, so we could lock in those Friday half-days.

My ratio is a placement for every 4 in-person sendouts, so I'd be making 5 placements a month if I had 5 sendouts a week. That's a pretty good month! :)

Agree as well that work/life is a huge consideration and it's how some of my clients differentiate themselves. I have to say, it's much easier to sell a candidate on a company that values work/life balance and things like flex-time/hours. I just made a placement this week that was a lower salary than what the candidate was ideally seeking, but he'd also be working far fewer hours at this company that at a big firm in the city. His commute will be shorter, and other benefits are great, like profit-sharing, etc. One of my banking clients was big with flex time and I would always emphasize that with candidates as they had the option of self-selecting where they wanted to work, up to 100% from home. That is very attractive to a lot of candidates.

~Pam


Dawn Skiba said:
Every generation is different. Every generation (all the way down to each person) is motivated by different factors. Good managers need to acknowledge and adjust their training, motivating, and communication to get the best out of your employees. Long gone are the days of working loyally for the same employer for 40 years with the reward of a pension and a watch.

As a recruiter, I ask every candidate "When you hear about an opportunity, what is the first most important thing you must hear to be interested? Second? Third?" From the younger work force, flex time or work/life balance is usually in the top 3. Another one is the culture and liking the people that they work with. That doesn't mean they aren't any less self motivated to excel at their job. They are still aware of their responsibilities and willing to do whatever it takes to get the desired results. It is what is important to them and motivates them. I don't think my younger candidates are any different than younger recruiters.

Being a successful recruiter takes much more than a 40 hour work week. Everyone of us is on the phone in the evenings talking to candidates that work in cubicles with ears. Everyone of us spends evenings planning our next day or doing internet research. Rewarding someone who gets 5 send outs per week with a Friday afternoon off is not offering them a 35 hour work week because it takes a whole lot more effort and hours to reach that goal.

Even if you are independant, you are going to motivate yourself with extra rewards or incentives. I like to buy myself something nice or get my nails done when a check comes in. I put an annual cruise into my business plan as a reward if I reach a net profit goal. Anyone that has lost weight will tell you that non food rewards at certain milestones helps keep you going and pushing harder. Is the ultimate reward a healthier body or a great big commission check? Of course! Shouldn't you just do it because of that ultimate reward alone? Of course! I still don't see anything wrong with incentives for small goals along the way to reaching that ultimate goal.

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Subscribe

All the recruiting news you see here, delivered straight to your inbox.

Just enter your e-mail address below

Webinar

RecruitingBlogs on Twitter

© 2022   All Rights Reserved   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Privacy Policy  |  Terms of Service