I want to start featuring a daily Recruiting Tip at the top of RecruitingBlogs.com. If you have one to share, please post it as as comment and once I have a number of them, I will start featuring one a day at the top of the network with a link back to your profile when it gets featured.

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Great idea Jason. I'll add each one to the weekly round-up.
Here is my tip and this one is for a someone who has two years or less but maybe it's applicable at all levels.

You want to work in a bullpen and there has to be someone in that bullpen who consistently out produces everyone else. If there's not, find a place where there is. You have to witness this in order to know that you will make money making placements and it is worth the time you are investing because really, you won't make a ton in your first 2 years.
Within a specific sector (or function such as finance, marketing or software development), take the past 6 months of hard publications and read all Letters to the Editor; for online zines, read the Comments. Easy sourcing 101...
Good logical advice but some many are reluctant to take, thinking they can make the "big bucks" right outta' the gate. I tell sourcers to work for someone who has a book of business they can rely on for an income stream for the first coupla' years - that way they'll see what works and what doesn't - but few take the advice and many fail as a result. For most, it'll take approximately three years to achieve a status where one can work alone in this (phone sourcing) business. And then, you need some marketing savvy to get yourself up and running.

"You want to work in a bullpen and there has to be someone in that bullpen who consistently out produces everyone else."

I was always bullied on by the tale of a sourcer who worked in the same org I started with who made $300,000 consistently working for the same org (this was in 1996). She had worked there for many years. I never met her - only heard the stories. Not sure if it was true or not but I think it was. She (supposedly) had the habit of delivering whole organizations within a company within hours. It can be done but it takes A LOT of practice! If she indeed was doing this the numbers ring true. I think I made like $20,000 the first year I started.
This is so true. I loved working in a bull pen environment and learned so much by sitting around more senior recruiters and being a sponge, soaking up everything I heard around me.

At the office I worked at, we had a 'board', a large whiteboard, and every time you made a placement you walked up to the board and put the number next to your name and adjusted the monthly totals. Anyone could see at a glance where their co-workers stood, who was billing what and it was a huge motivator. Many of us would push each other to try and outdo each other's billing, so seeing the progress in real time made a huge difference.

When talking to new people who were thinking of joining the company, I used to tell them straight up that they wouldn't make much their first year and that they'd really need to commit to two solid years before they'd see the payoff. That they'd have to work long and hard that first year and then if they did the same in their second year, they would likely double or triple their income in that second year, and that's when they'd start to see the real money that was possible in recruiting, for those who dig in and go after it.

Slouch said:
Here is my tip and this one is for a someone who has two years or less but maybe it's applicable at all levels.

You want to work in a bullpen and there has to be someone in that bullpen who consistently out produces everyone else. If there's not, find a place where there is. You have to witness this in order to know that you will make money making placements and it is worth the time you are investing because really, you won't make a ton in your first 2 years.
Recruiter’s jump too easily at any opportunity to show how smart they are by making a presentation about their candidate database or service's features and benefits. They forget their true goal is to
“create a relationship” Think of yourself as a doctor instead. A physician examines the patient thoroughly before making a recommendation, using various instruments to conduct the examination.
In selling, questions are the instrument to conduct a qualifying examination of the candidate and client.

Top Billers have an aversion to loose ends. They need to know where they stand and what must be done to move to the next step in accomplishing their goal. They have the need for control and for constant movement toward the goal with each rung in the ladder firmly in place. Even in casual conversation they attempt to get closure on any points left up in the air.
This is so ridiculously simple but it seems to have been forgotten today, "Tell the truth." To everyone, clients, candidates other recruiters, then you will never have to remember who you are speaking with. Principles along with morals do matter.

An ethical man knows it's wrong to cheat on his wife.

A moral man doesn't cheat on his wife.
Here's a tip more on the marketing front:

Make a point to post something - blog post, forum response, start a discussion, etc. - on a relevant community site/network at least once a day. When I say relevant community I mean within a network where your candidates and/or job orders may come from. It's free and is an effective way to make yourself visible.

Mike
These days recruiters will be successful if they are open to change. This means dealing patiently with opening and closing job orders, stalled interviews, clients who freeze their hiring - and being ready to jump onto new opportunities as soon as they arise.

This also means being open to learning about new industries and sectors depending on who's hiring; picking and using new technologies as they are introduced, both for automation of routine tasks and for searching and organizing information; scanning for and trying hints and advice from the blogosphere - including RBC, of course.
This one is overly simple as well, but surprisingly not followed that much... you must "listen and question". Listen to what people are and are not saying, ie did they avoid something, was there a pause from a potential client where there could be more information waiting? Then question, nothing on face value, confirm and question, clients and candidates alike.
Although it is true that time is money, don't bail on a conversation just because you can't do a deal with them that month. Build relationships first and business will follow.
Good ideas Jason. I will add one that works for me regarding communication.

Become fanatical about calling people on time and always follow up with people (candidates or hiring managers) when you say you will. Use your calendar for this and once you get in the habit of doing it, it is easy.

Don't have time to call? Don't tell them you will and put the responsibility on them to get back in touch with you unless you have new information.

Give hiring manager updates even if you don't have candidates when you are actively working an order. You can always share the word on the street or some valuable intelligence and they will know you are still working. I do this every day or two after the first week.

If you do these things, you will exceed most people's expectations right out of the gate.

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