Future Finances: The Rise and Fall of Lockdown Investments

Since the COVID-19 pandemic forced the UK nation to stay at home for most of 2020, finding ways to keep ourselves entertained was never an easy task. Other than our physical and mental health, our financial situation has also been put to the test in these difficult times.

Many people have been looking to safeguard their finances. Recent search volume data suggests that more of us have taken an interest in long-term investments during lockdown. As we continue to live through uncertain times, it’s important we stay optimistic for the months to come. What better way to do this than investing in something for the future of our finances?

Although the UK recession has inevitably caused the value of our investments to fall, it means that the cost of investing in an asset is cheaper. In the longer term, it’s a given that the value of investments will exceed the amount we paid for them originally once the economy is back on its feet.

So, what investments have the UK been most interested in over lockdown? Here with Angelic Diamonds, we analyse Google search volume data over the course of 2020 to see which investments are trending.

Whiskey Business

We all know whiskey as a drink that satisfies the nation’s tastebuds every now and then. But expert investors suggest that rare whiskey can also be a better investment than gold and classic cars. Recent data also reveals that rare whiskey has experienced a 582% price growth over the last decade. This could be the catalyst behind the 105% increase in whiskey investment-related terms between January and September this year.

Further, the term ‘whiskey as an investment’ has experienced an increase from 1,900 searches in January to 5,400 searches in September.

It’s clear that this ‘liquid gold’ is trending in the investment world right now. Although considered a safe investment by experts, be sure not to jump the gun and get caught in a ‘scotch scam’.

The Art of Investing

When you think of an investment, art might not be what initially springs to mind. However, since art does not correlate with the stock market, it means that its value can increase despite the market crashing. Due to the economic recession the UK is experiencing, art could be the safest investment on the market right now.

Google search volumes suggest that the UK has taken this on board. Searches for ‘art as an investment’ increasing from 720 in March to 1,000 in September. The term ‘making money from art’ has also experienced an increase over recent months, excelling from 90 in March to 210 by July.

Jewellery or Investment Pieces?

It’s no secret that jewellery is a highly profitable investment. From diamond necklaces to palladium rings, jewellery presents an abundance of investment opportunities. In recent months, it appears that many people in the UK have taken an interest in these investments and have placed gold metal jewellery at the heart of their searches. So much so, searches for ‘gold buyers’ almost doubled from 9,900 in January to 18,100 in August.

The nation also has a new-found interest in ‘selling jewellery’ to investors too, with searches for this term increasing from 1,600 in March to 2,400 in September. On the other hand, not all jewellery appears to be a hit. Searches for ‘engagement rings buyers’ decreased from 1,000 searches in January to 880 in September.

Depending on where your taste in jewellery lies, the industry is filled with investment opportunities that could boost your finances in the future.

Wishful Watches

Watches are not only an accessory to invest in, but they are also considered to be an investment that increases in value. This is providing they are stored and looked after correctly. For those looking to invest in a watch for the future, focus on high-end watches. Items such as vintage Rolex sports watches are thought to be one of the safest investments.

However, Google search volumes suggest that watch investments aren’t what the nation is looking for in 2020. Searches for the term ‘watches as an investment’ has experienced a decrease from 1,300 in January to 1,000 in September. The initial cost of purchasing a watch as an investment tends to be expensive. Perhaps the financial state of the economy is discouraging this investment.

On the other hand, it seems more people are looking to sell their watches to other investors. The term ‘Rolex buyers’ increasing in searches from 1,900 in March to 2,900 searches in September.

Handbags

If you’re looking for a fashionable way to diversify your investments, handbags are a great place to start. In July 2020, a report by Forbes suggested that handbags from high-end designers including Hermes, Louis Vuitton, and Chanel outperform classic cars and whiskies when it comes to investment valuations. So much so, the value of handbags has increased by around 85% in the last 10 years.

With this in mind, the UK appears to have jumped on board the investment trend for handbags. Searches for handbags as investment related-terms experienced an overall increase of 10% between January and September.

More specifically, terms such as ‘sell designer bags’ is something the nation has took an increasing interest in over the months, with this term rising from 320 searches in April to 880 searches by September.

 

With the world continuing to live through unprecedented times, supporting our future finances has never been more important. Because we can’t all be experts on private equity and the stock markets, it’s always good to get a bit of guidance!

Whether your interests lie in whiskey, jewellery, or handbags, there are multiple industries that are boasting with investment opportunities right now—you just need to know where to look.

 

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