Question of the day: What are some reasons for a candidate to stop communicating with a recruiter once the interview has taken place?

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_7vzq_SckGV8/TTjgQh1wUnI/AAAAAAAABlM/Q8_XX17bius/s1600/mouth_tape.jpg


In follow up to today's RBC Daily:


Question of the day: What are some reasons for a candidate to stop communicating with a recruiter once the interview has taken place?

Views: 529

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Tim - it's a good question, and I think there are a couple of likely reasons.  Either it's because the candidate thinks they have been mis-sold something i.e. the job sounds a lot different in the interview than how the recruiter described it, and therefore lost faith with the recruiter.  Or possibly they feel the interview went really badly - they hadn't prepared for it, they couldn't answer many of the questions, and they are simply a bit embarrassed, and maybe they don't want to hear the feedback.  If anything I think this point highlights the essential step in the process for a recruiter to fully prepare their candidates before the first interview.  

Typically a candidate will communicate with a recruiter unless the candidate is having some conflicted feelings or a changed situation.  For instance, the candidate explained to you that he needed to leave his employer and was not at all interested in staying.  However something changed and the candidate either got a promotion or a raise or promises of such and now is no longer interested in changing jobs.   Perhaps the candidate has another position not through the recruiter that he wants to take.

Very frustrating when you get no call or email after an interview and they dissapear.  I usually get a little nervous I'm getting "taken" on something.  It has happend enough time that I now have a conversation about understanding if they get job elsewhere, they decide they no longer want to be in the market or whatever, there is no hard feelings, maybe I can work with them down the road.  That being said, my firm won't work with you down the road if you dissapear.  That has not only helped curb the vanishing act, but also I have had people come back to me 6 months later and we get them hired on.

Indifference

A number of possible reasons: no respect for the recruiter or the process, the candidate feels your job is done and they can do the rest on their own, they don't want to continue the process and are afraid to tell you...etc.  If so, and the client isn't interested in moving on, so should you.

I could only be so lucky.  Mine talk to me until my eyes roll back in my head.  The only one i ever had that quit talking actually died, that was unnerving.  I have to try and convince them that it is time for me to step back to let them interact with the hiring manager.

Same reason a recruiter doesn't need to communicate with the candidate.  S/he FUBAR'd

Tim from my experience and yes it does happen to all of us at some point in our career. The candidate either feels that they are in and don't need your help and they can do this without us.  As human beings if we do not see the value in something than more than likely we don't use it anymore. 

 

I have a candidates expectations document that I share with my candidates during our first conversation that simply lays out the ground rules.  You have to consistnely show the candidate our value to them and let them know that we have a vested interest in the positive outcome of the recruitment process.

 

When candidates know the WIIFM (What In It For Me) than they are more than likely to keep us included.  Additionally all of us that are control nuts need to relax and let things go sometimes.

 

Hope this helps.

 

John Fulcher

Director with Bauer Consulting Group, Inc.

 

Tim from my experience and yes it does happen to all of us at some point in our career. The candidate either feels that they are in and don't need your help and they can do this without us.  As human beings if we do not see the value in something than more than likely we don't use it anymore. 

 

I have a candidate’s expectations document that I share with my candidates during our first conversation that simply lays out the ground rules.  You have to consistently show the candidate our value to them and let them know that we have a vested interest in the positive outcome of the recruitment process.

 

When candidates know the WIIFM (What in It for Me) than they are more than likely to keep us included.  Additionally all of us that are control nuts need to relax and let things go sometimes.

 

Hope this helps.

 

John Fulcher

Director with Bauer Consulting Group, Inc.

Prior to the interview, the phone calls to recruiter are to follow up, gaining client information, know about job description etc.  But after the interview, only few give a report to the recruiter regrading what happened,  while others want to be called by the recruiters. Other reasons could be, they are not interested to pursue further.

good reply; well articulated, john.

John Fulcher said:

 

Tim from my experience and yes it does happen to all of us at some point in our career. The candidate either feels that they are in and don't need your help and they can do this without us.  As human beings if we do not see the value in something than more than likely we don't use it anymore. 

 

I have a candidate’s expectations document that I share with my candidates during our first conversation that simply lays out the ground rules.  You have to consistently show the candidate our value to them and let them know that we have a vested interest in the positive outcome of the recruitment process.

 

When candidates know the WIIFM (What in It for Me) than they are more than likely to keep us included.  Additionally all of us that are control nuts need to relax and let things go sometimes.

 

Hope this helps.

 

John Fulcher

Director with Bauer Consulting Group, Inc.

lucky you, Sandra !

Sandra McCartt said:

I could only be so lucky.  Mine talk to me until my eyes roll back in my head.  The only one i ever had that quit talking actually died, that was unnerving.  I have to try and convince them that it is time for me to step back to let them interact with the hiring manager.

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Subscribe

All the recruiting news you see here, delivered straight to your inbox.

Just enter your e-mail address below

Webinar

RecruitingBlogs on Twitter

© 2021   All Rights Reserved   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Privacy Policy  |  Terms of Service